Snippets

Snippets: Chats With Creatives – Series 2, Snippet 4

Snippets’. Chats with Creatives. We are back with series two! Here at Digital Fabrics we love everything print, pattern and colour and we love to know what makes designers tick. This second series is all about asking some fun and different questions and learning about the inspirations and ideas behind the artist and their work. We hope to inspire others by sharing snippets of these creative stories. We gave the artists and designers featured a varied and different set from series one list of questions to choose from so we will learn something new from everyone involved, should be fun!

Today on snippets we are talking to Bianca from Bianca Smith Designs who creates artworks that are about empowering women and combine her love for theatre, ballet and beauty in a majestic and magical way. Her style is very unique and she creates a variety of artworks that translate across mediums.

biancasmithdesigns_snippets_series_2_image4Tell us a bit about yourself, your brand/label name what your creative practice is, how and when you began:

My name is Bianca, known affectionately by friends as ‘Bi’, which I also use to sign all of my work.

I’m a Graphic Designer and Visual Artist by trade and I am based in Adelaide. I’ve been a Graphic Designer for close to 20 years where I am able to use my flair for design, but my true passion is art, so over the past 10 years I have invested every moment I can into refining and developing my visual art skills. I love to draw, paint and create.  My utopia is producing art all day every day!

My art work always addresses the empowerment of women – almost a goddess status. Bringing together my love of theatre/ballet and beauty, I try to capture the strength and beauty of my characters in an almost theatrical way. I take inspiration from the novels that I read featuring female heroines as well as the inspiring women that I meet. My use of dramatic light and beautiful models assists in portraying the strength and resilience of women.

Drawing from my other love, fashion, I did a series of illustrative for Australian Fashion Labels. My works focused on capturing the strength and confidence of the girls that wear their clothing, whilst portraying the playful essence of the brand. By mixing monotone drawings with a splash of colour, I aimed to change the tone and strength, creating images of women who are powerful yet delicate. This is universally at the core of what I produce.

biancasmithdesigns_snippets_series_2_image2Where do you call home?

Adelaide

What 3 words best describe your creative style.

Illustrative, Modern, Contemporary.

Which part of the creative process is your favourite and why?

I love the conception of a piece of artwork.  The tumbling of images in my mind, which eventually form and crystallise from an idea, a concept, into a clear vision.  That vision then becomes an obsession, a desperate struggle to be formed with exact replication.  I obsess over sharing my image with precision and that drive continues throughout the process, that desire to replicate perfectly is a bitter, sweet scuffle.

How would you describe your work, and what influences your style?

Although my artistic style can, and does vary, depending on my life and surroundings, I’m also heavily influenced by fashion illustration and my own passion for clothing.  The textures, the colours, the cut, and the design all inspire me. I predominantly work in pastel and watercolour and although I create every piece of artwork by hand, I then use the finished original image, together with various digital techniques to create a series of pieces, combining my art with my design skills.

Fashion and women heavily influence my style. I love, love, love fashion, perhaps another personal obsession!

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What does a typical creative day look like for you? How do you stay on plan and organised?

After getting up at the crack of dawn to exercise and then get my kids ready and off to school, I usually start my working day with a much-needed coffee and the checking of emails. Unfortunately, the reality of life means some days I don’t leave my computer, but whenever time permits, I surrender to my obsessive desire to escape to my studio and create.

Depending on which stage in the process a piece of artwork is, you will either find me upstairs in my studio drawing life into an image or enhancing that original piece of art in Photoshop as I design something for my unique collection of diary covers, pillows, cards, and homewares.

I’m a deadline kind of a girl, it’s the only way I can stay on task. That’s why I love projects where there is an objective and a deadline. I thrive under pressure and produce my best work with adrenaline, conflicting priorities and a little chaos.

biancasmithdesigns_snippets_series_2_image7What would your dream creative project look like? Who or what is your dream project, client or job? Tell us about why you would love to collaborate with them and what you find inspiring about their work.

My absolute dream creative project would be working collaboratively with a ‘fashion house’ to illustrate their models and garments for window display and the associated promotional campaign.  Having unrestricted access to their design method, the inner workings of a label and seeing their creative process unfold would be nothing less than inspirational.  To then have the honour of representing that in art form, bringing that vision to life is my ultimate goal.

If you could spend a day in another artist’s studio shoes who would that artist be?

Kelly Smith of ‘Birdyandme’ fame, works with all the top fashion labels around the world and I’m a massive fan of her work. If I could be in her shoes for a day I would honestly be living my dream. Or Gabriel Moreno – who is an AMAZING artist overseas. He has a remarkable ability to capture the delicacy, strength, and sensuality of women in his drawings. They are just astonishing! I would love to even have a day in his studio to watch him work.

biancasmithdesigns_snippets_series_2_image6.jpgbiancasmithdesigns_snippets_series_2_image1What would you say is the biggest challenge when working for yourself ?

Staying positive about your work!

Social media can be a double edge sword as it both inspires and intimidates. It is full of people posting about their successes and digital platforms have a knack of focusing on the positives whilst minimising or eliminating the negatives, the sacrifices, struggles and setbacks.  It is easy to assume “their” life is perfect, easy, and unattainable when there a no posts about failure.

The truth is, for every success there has usually been many challenges, rejections, and disappointments. It’s important to learn from them all and allow it to fuel your growth, stretch you, and inspire you. I often question my skills and direction, but sometimes you just need to believe in yourself and your vision. And then of course practice, practice and practice some more until your craft is refined to its full potential.

If you could go back and tell yourself one hot tip or piece of advice when you started out what would it be?

Believe in yourself and follow your heart

What has been your proudest creative business achievement to date?

Doing an artist residency with Australian Fashion Labels. I worked from their creative hub in Adelaide City for 3 months, putting together a dedicate exhibition, which was then displayed in their store windows throughout SALA (South Australian Living Artist).

What projects or collaborations from last year stuck out, good or bad and what is coming up this year that you would like to plug!

The project that stood out for me last year was doing all the illustrations for the wine labels of an established winery in Mclaren Vale. They will be launching very soon, I cant wait to share them.

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biancasmithdesigns_snippets_series_2_image8You can follow what Bianca is up to: Website, Instagram, Facebook.

Snippets: Chats With Creatives – Series 2, Snippet 2

Snippets’. Chats with Creatives. We are back with series two! Here at Digital Fabrics we love everything print, pattern and colour and we love to know what makes designers tick. This second series is all about asking some fun and different questions and learning about the inspirations and ideas behind the artist and their work. We hope to inspire others by sharing snippets of these creative stories. We gave the artists and designers featured a varied and different set from series one list of questions to choose from so we will learn something new from everyone involved, should be fun!

Today on Snippets we are talking to Kate Blairstone, a US based artist, illustrator and designer who’s work can be seen across textiles, wallpaper and art prints with a unique and nostalgic botanical theme running throughout.

Kate_blairstone_snippets_series2_image4.jpgTell us a bit about yourself, your brand/label name what your creative practice is, how and when you began:

I design custom wallpaper and draw lots of stuff (mostly plants) under my own name. My formal education is in Printmaking – I build up images in layers, sometimes using ink on tissue, sometimes digitally. My business launched officially in the Fall of 2016.

I worked behind the scenes in restaurants for years before going full freelance. In that time I accumulated every possible creative hobby (leatherworking, beadwork, gardening) before figuring out that I could combine all those things into surface design and illustration. The restaurant where I worked always needed design help, so I resurrected my art degree to maintain their menu and website. Eventually when we opened a new location, the owner gave me the opportunity to help design the space, including a huge focal wallpaper.

Kate_blairstone_snippets_series2_image8Where do you call home?

I live in the St. Johns neighborhood of Portland, Oregon with my husband and 15 month old son.

What 3 words best describe your creative style?

Lush, Loud, Adventurous.

Which part of the creative process is your favourite and why?

I enjoy combing the visual world for inspiration, building color palettes, finding unexpected ways to communicate with color. Taking time to draw from life, getting into a meditative headspace and using my pencil to observe how a thing is structured. Mark making, especially with brushes and black india ink, where color isn’t a consideration at all, and I can just focus on the shape my brush makes. Twist my arm, and I might say my absolute favorite part is coloring my images, when I’ve been through all these other steps and the pieces finally come together.

Kate_blairstone_snippets_series2_image1Kate_blairstone_snippets_series2_image6.jpgHow would you describe your work, and what influences your style?

I think of what I do like looking at the world through tinted glasses, or at a photograph that’s yellowed as it’s aged. The color of light has a wonderful way of evoking memory and a sense of time and place; it’s a distorted reality. My palettes are designed to enhance this feeling. I spend lots of time looking at plants and working in my garden, and when I travel I pay particular attention to how the plants I grow are contextualized differently in other places, through both landscape and surface design traditions. It helps me to see things anew. I’m delighted by the cycles of my garden, of food and of fashion – I especially love when an iconic style can be seen through the lens of another era or culture and across media, like 70s Victorian Revival, or Art Deco Architecture via Latin America, or 60s MOD as seen through Italian Horror. My husband is a comic book artist: we are always playing with mashups to describe our work and find new inspiration.

Kate_blairstone_snippets_series2_image3If you could go back and tell yourself one hot tip or piece of advice when you started out what would it be?

Though I’ve always been creative and went to art school, it took me a long time – too long, maybe – to really own it. And it took me a long time to find a medium that really took hold of me the way that illustration has. Looking back, I can say confidently that everything I dabbled in has its place in my creative heart, and made my work what it is now. But I wish that I hadn’t been so scared to call myself Artist, to give myself to making things with my whole being. For years I thought I needed some kind of credential; the only thing that mattered ultimately was the permission I gave myself. An Artist is a person who makes art, and that’s what I do. If this resonates for you, go read Elizabeth Gilbert’s “Big Magic.” Living a creative life is what it’s all about, y’all. Also a reminder to myself, always: doing your life’s work is a long game, give yourself the time and make the commitment to get there.

What has been your proudest creative business achievement to date?

It gives me great pride to have built my portfolio to a point where my clients recognize my style, see what I can do for them and – for the most part – give me the freedom to do it. As a commercial artist there is sometimes enormous pressure to conform in order to get enough paid work to make it. It is such a privilege to have this kind of trust, and an absolute joy to deliver on it. Also I hired an accountant this year, which felt like such a big girl move, I literally teared up in the parking lot after our first meeting.

Kate_blairstone_snippets_series2_image10.jpgWhich other artists/ designers/ makers, artists or creative people are you enjoying at the moment?

Right now I’m inspired by Petra Borner, Andy Dixon, Tyler Keeton Robbins, Michelle Morin, Sonia Pulido, Marisol Ortega, Anisa Makhoul, and Gucci Gucci Gucci. All great follows.

What would your dream creative project look like? Who or what is your dream project, client or job? Tell us about why you would love to collaborate with them and what you find inspiring about their work.

For me, great projects involve trust, the opportunity to solve good problems, research and analysis, collaboration, strategy and beauty. I’ve been lucky enough be a part of a few such projects in my career; those experiences have shaped the way I find meaning in what I do, and defined the kind of work I’m looking for going forward. I love to participate in translating feelings visually – I get really excited about differentiating brands. There are so many small-scale production methods available to us now, why use the same stuff when we can be fantastically different?

My dream clients are great collaborators, passionate about what they do, confident in communicating their vision, and hire the right people for the right job. The beauty of seeing my work this way is that there are lots of dream clients to be had out there, but if Gucci wanted to hire me I might literally throw myself at Alessandro Michele’s feet.

Kate_blairstone_snippets_series2_image5.jpgYou can follow what Kate is upto: Website, Instagram

Snippets: Chats With Creatives – Series 2, Snippet 1

Snippets’. Chats with Creatives. We are back with series two! Here at Digital Fabrics we love everything print, pattern and colour and we love to know what makes designers tick. This second series is all about asking some fun and different questions and learning about the inspirations and ideas behind the artist and their work. We hope to inspire others by sharing snippets of these creative stories. We gave the artists and designers featured a varied and different set from series one list of questions to choose from so we will learn something new from everyone involved, should be fun!

Today on Snippets we are talking to Katelyn Tso, the textile designer behind Indigo Thread, a beautiful brand creating homewares, accessories and clothing as part of the slow fashion movement.

Tell us a bit about yourself, your brand/label name what your creative practice is, how and when you began:

I’m Katelyn, the designer and maker behind Indigo Thread. I’ve always loved design. All through high school I would make my own clothes, screen printing, sewing and adjusting op shop finds. After school I started studying Interior Design, however after the first year I realised that interior design wasn’t for me, rather I loved designing individual textile products. It wasn’t until I became a mum that I found the time to sew again and I started Indigo Thread. I’m now a self-taught textile designer, making accessories, homewares and a clothing range coming soon.

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Indigo_thread_wares_snippets_2_image4Where do you call home?

I currently live in Sydney but I grew up on The Central Coast of NSW and it still feels like home to me.

What 3 words best describe your creative style.

Simple Shapes – Fun Prints (sorry that’s more than 3 words)

Which part of the creative process is your favourite and why?

Seeing the finished product come together for the first time. Sometimes I skip ahead, not completing the steps in the most effective order because I’m so excited to see the finished product.

Indigo_thread_wares_snippets_2_image2How would you describe your work, and what influences your style?

Simple designs and shapes with stylised and fun floral prints inspired by Australian native flowers. My desire for practical yet attractive products fuels my designs.

What does a typical creative day look like for you? How do you stay on plan and organised? 

Being a work from home/stay at home mum means that it can be a bit all over the place and my work is very disrupted. I have a little more time now that my eldest has started preschool 3 days a week but I still have to fit work into small time slots throughout the day. I stay organised by writing lists. Daily, weekly and monthly to-do-lists help me keep focused.

Depending on the time of year and if I have a market to prep for, I could be just sewing sewing sewing. Whereas other quieter times I get a chance to design some new products and fabrics, so it varies a lot.

Tell us about your creative space, what are your tips for keeping a creative studio space organised.

My studio isn’t really a studio. It’s a big desk in the living room of my 2 bedroom apartment. My husband hates that I take up so much space in our home, especially when I take over the dining table as well (it’s the perfect place for screen printing and cutting out fabric). I would love to have a studio one day, or at least a separate room that I can shut the door on the mess but for now it’s working for me. I don’t mind a little bit of creative clutter but I do regularly have to re-organise so that I have the space to work and I always feel like I can work better with a clean workspace. The best tip I have is get a good storage system. I have these amazing deep drawers in my work desk (custom built by my dad out of an old pallet) that store all my sewing bits and pieces as well as a cupboard full of fabric.

Indigo_thread_wares_snippets_2_image6Indigo_thread_wares_snippets_2_image7What/who inspired you to take the leap in to your creative venture, how did you get started?

I just started Indigo Thread as a hobby while I was on maternity leave and I think that made it not feel like a leap, it just kind of happened naturally. I didn’t have the pressure to make money from it straight away which was nice and I think I’ve enjoyed the process more because of it.

Tell us about how you get your creative juices flowing, what is your process?

I am inspired constantly by the beautiful world around me. By colours, shapes and nature. I’m often taking photos of flowers or colour combinations to reference later as well as looking at clothing styles and figuring out how they were made.

Indigo_thread_wares_snippets_2_image1What projects or collaborations from last year stuck out, good or bad and what is coming up this year that you would like to plug!

I loved working with my bestie, Nicole from Better Together Paper, on a collaboration of Prezzie Sacks last year. We love a chance to catch up and be creative together.

This year I’m so excited to be launching a range of women’s tops. I’m currently still in the design phase but they will be released in the next month or so. Think simple boxy tops in my Australian botanical fabrics.

Indigo_thread_wares_snippets_2_image9You can follow what Katelyn is upto: Website, Instagram, Facebook.

Snippets: Chats With Creatives – Series 1, Snippet 10

Snippets’. Chats with Creatives. Here at Digital Fabrics we love everything print, pattern and colour and we love to know what makes designers tick. This series is all about asking some fun and different questions and learning about the inspirations and ideas behind the artist and their work. We hope to inspire others by sharing snippets of these creative stories. We gave the artists and designers featured a varied list of questions to choose from so we will learn something new from everyone involved, should be fun!

Today on Snippets we are talking to Lara Cross, the textile designer behind Glorybox Designs, a bright and eclectic range of fabrics, fashion and jewellery based on prints. She has a vibrant passion for colour and her quirky style is evident throughout her work.

Glorybox_designs_digital_fabrics_custom_fabric_printing_2The Snippety Snips:

Tell us a bit about yourself and what your creative practice is, how and when you began:

Looking back on my upbringing, it seems so obvious that I would end up being a textile designer- but really, I didn’t even know it was a thing until I was in my third year of studying fashion. Even fashion design was a late start for me, I had initially planned on being some sort of creative director and studied Drama and Film at uni, then lived in China for five years and came home to ‘start’ my life. It took a long time to find that field where my skills just clicked in to place, but I did have a great time getting there! Being surrounded by beautiful textiles, colours and prints was just normal to me, I didn’t know that I could be ‘good enough’ to do that too. I think I have always struggled to prove to everyone that so-called normal people can love colour, and that just because you’re creative it doesn’t mean you’re an idiot. It’s probably not your experience if you grow up in a city, but I grew up in a small town and there is certain pressure to conform- so a lot of my work and ranges tend to have a story behind them, a little provocation and thought to give it meaning as well as beauty.

I enjoy word-play, puns and often have a bit of tongue-in-cheek when I come up with a new theme- my last range was called ‘Iconoscopy‘ which was a tribute to our aging rock icons, and the next range is battle Armor for modern feminists, so no doubt there will be subtle references to female anatomy as well as some more blatant imagery. I have been compiling war words that we use daily, and I’ll start sketching off those, from there I’ll probably end up in mixed media experimentation and move into digital. I work with both screen and digital prints, but the designs always go through the computer before they get there. Digital design is definitely one of the late great discoveries of my life. I use my prints in my clothing and in my resin jewellery, I am very hands-on.

Glorybox_designs_digital_fabrics_custom_fabric_printing_4

Glorybox_designs_digital_fabrics_custom_fabric_printing_6Which part of the creative process is your favourite and why?

I love colour mixing when I screen print. I don’t really plan ahead I just go in with an open mind and play. I was also pretty surprised to discover how much I love the minutiae of digital design and getting right into the pixels to create repeats. It’s a secret language. There’s lots to enjoy.

What would your dream creative project look like?

The day I get the phone call from Romance Was Born to collaborate on a range….that will be a pretty great day. (Just to be clear, they can also email me)

Which other Australian designers, artists or creative people are you enjoying?

I am thoroughly enjoying the work of Haus of Dizzy and Doodad and Fandango– they are both forging great paths in sticking it to the patriarchy, all while looking awesome. The rise of dressing for yourself is something that really appeals to me and my customers.

Glorybox_designs_digital_fabrics_custom_fabric_printing_5

Glorybox_designs_digital_fabrics_custom_fabric_printing_7In another life what natural talent would you wish for?

I would love to write raunchy high-society books like Jackie Collins and Rebecca Chance. Maybe I still will….

Love your Locals:

City/Town/Village where you currently reside:

Dulwich Hill (Sydney’s hipster Inner West)

Favourite spot for a bite:

IKEA, not a popular choice I know but I get really freaked out by how obsessed people are with “good’ coffee or things served on wooden boards.

Secret Inspirational spot:

I love the run-down and industrial, behind my house there is a derelict lot that has lots of tire piles, runaway bamboo and fabulous rusty things. It’s being demolished bit by bit (there was an amazing old warehouse I could sketch in and spray paint on) but for now it still a bit of a secret garden of crap that I can enjoy.

Glorybox_designs_digital_fabrics_custom_fabric_printing_3You can follow what Lara is upto: Website, Instagram, Facebook

Snippets: Chats With Creatives – Series 1, Snippet 9

Snippets’. Chats with Creatives. Here at Digital Fabrics we love everything print, pattern and colour and we love to know what makes designers tick. This series is all about asking some fun and different questions and learning about the inspirations and ideas behind the artist and their work. We hope to inspire others by sharing snippets of these creative stories. We gave the artists and designers featured a varied list of questions to choose from so we will learn something new from everyone involved, should be fun!

Today on Snippet’s we are talking to Sara Johnson, the artist behind ‘Travelling Alice’ a printmaker based in Sydney who designs and prints her own fabric before making it into unique accessories.

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The Snippety Snips:

Tell us a bit about yourself and what your creative practice is, how and when you began:

Travelling Alice is a range of hand printed travel accessories, made in my Sydney Studio.

I studied Fine Arts just out of High School as I just wanted to Draw, while there I learnt Printing (wow ) I could turn my drawings into prints.

At nineteen I got the opportunity to volunteer in India for three months, and this is where my love of fabrics and Crafts came from and of course my travelling obsession began, seeing all these amazing artist, crafts people. Traveling Alice Started from a need to make light weight and colourful travel accessories for myself and friends. I am such an organised traveller I like to pack things so they are easy to find but of course they have to look good as well.

Travelling Alice_digital fabrics_custom fabric_fabric printing

Travelling Alice_digital fabrics_custom fabric_fabric printing 3Which part of the creative process is your favourite and why?

Drawing drawing and drawing. My Mum is a sign writer so I have always been around pencils, pens and brushes my whole life so it feels as natural as eating. By the way I have the worst hand writing, so I did not get this talent.

How would you describe your work, and what influences your style? 

I design fabric that I can sew into accessories. Travel definitely influences my style and my life. I became obsessed with it when I first travelled to India when I was 19. This was also where my love of Fabrics and pattern came from, you get exposed to colour and patterns, it’s a feast for the eyes.

Travelling Alice_digital fabrics_custom fabric_fabric printing 7

Travelling Alice_digital fabrics_custom fabric_fabric printing 4If you could have your portrait painted by any artist dead or alive, who would you choose?

Louise Bourgeois, that would be amazing and fun, she was known for her Sculptures but I love her printmaking. Louise Bourgeois was also known for her dry humour so we could have a laugh at the same time.

Love your Locals:

City/Town/Village where you currently reside:

Sydney South

Favourite spot for a bite:

I am a Coffee lover so food is a second thought so my favourite place to get coffee is White Horse Coffee in Sutherland

Secret Inspirational spot:

To be honest I find inspiration anywhere and anytime of the day or night. I have numerous note books so I can quickly write the inspiration down.

Travelling Alice_digital fabrics_custom fabric_fabric printing 2You can follow what Sara is upto: Website, Instagram, Facebook

Snippets: Chats With Creatives – Series 1, Snippet 8

Snippets’. Chats with Creatives. Here at Digital Fabrics we love everything print, pattern and colour and we love to know what makes designers tick. This series is all about asking some fun and different questions and learning about the inspirations and ideas behind the artist and their work. We hope to inspire others by sharing snippets of these creative stories. We gave the artists and designers featured a varied list of questions to choose from so we will learn something new from everyone involved, should be fun!

Today on Snippet’s we are talking to Anna Hayman, a UK based print designer who creates fabrics, wallpaper and other homewares from original lino printing and ink drawings. Her work is influenced by the art and craft era as well as the sixties and seventies which is clear in her current work.

Anna-Hayman-digital_fabrics_custom_fabric_printing_5The Snippety Snips:

Tell us a bit about yourself and what your creative practice is, how and when you began:

I am a British print designer specialising in printed lampshades, wallpapers, fabrics and cushions. I create my designs from linoprints and ink paintings. I began trading in February 2016

Which part of the creative process is your favourite and why?

My favourite part is transforming artwork – in my case a Lino print or an ink painting – into a pattern. Pattern is my utter obsession so creating repeat designs from artwork is a really exciting point for me, often there are literally endless possibilities of how it can be repeated, mirrored or formed, and seeing that take shape is completely thrilling. That comes just before the worst part, getting the pattern to repeat, which can take forever and is truly boring! Luckily I’m a bit of a geek :)

How would you describe your work, and what influences your style? I would describe my work as half hippy, half traditionalist, intricate, relaxed and colourful. I’m influenced by old English styles, I visit a lot of old places, and 1920’s places, but also love Bohemian 70’s style. Creatives I’m influenced by are Celia Birtwell, Biba, The Bloomsbury Group, Olaf Hajek, Aubrey Beardsley and many more.

Anna-Hayman-digital_fabrics_custom_fabric_printing_4Anna-Hayman-digital_fabrics_custom_fabric_printing_6In another life what natural talent would you wish for?

Writing! I have been reading a lot about the lives of writers recently and I must say it does seem an appealing occupation. I’ve always told myself I am terrible at writing, especially copy, but really I just haven’t had the space to explore it. I would love to take a summer learning how to construct a book, for instance.

Which other Australian designers, artists or creative people are you enjoying at the moment?

Estelle Briedis, for her exacting palettes of colour, Nine Lives Bazaar for their beautiful brand building skills and photography, and Instagram legend @labohemehouseofthewishingtrees for her inspiring and abundant use of brights with white, and layering of textures.

If you could only use one colour in your work what would it be?

Hard question! But I’m crushing hard on jade at the moment, a sort of greenish turquoise, a colour which can be hot and cool, and quenching somehow. I’d find it hard to live without orange though, deep vibrant orange, warm and fresh at the same time.

Anna-Hayman-digital_fabrics_custom_fabric_printing_7If you could have your portrait painted by any artist dead or alive, who would you choose?

Lucian Freud, not just because I love his work (I love flat looking paintings with a lot of detail) but because I feel I have the right sort of face for his portraiture.

Which five words best describe you?

English, rebellious, clever, arty, fun.

Love your Locals:

City/Town/Village where you currently reside:

Ringmer in Sussex, England.

Favourite spot for a bite:

Any good seafood restaurant, or sushi place.

Secret Inspirational spot:

Charleston farmhouse, the Bloomsbury group country house hotspot of the 1920’s, which is 15 minutes from where I live.

Anna-Hayman-digital_fabrics_custom_fabric_printing_1

You can follow what Anna is upto: Website, Instagram, Facebook

Snippets: Chats With Creatives – Series 1, Snippet 7

Snippets’. Chats with Creatives. Here at Digital Fabrics we love everything print, pattern and colour and we love to know what makes designers tick. This series is all about asking some fun and different questions and learning about the inspirations and ideas behind the artist and their work. We hope to inspire others by sharing snippets of these creative stories. We gave the artists and designers featured a varied list of questions to choose from so we will learn something new from everyone involved, should be fun!

Today on Snippet’s we are talking to Dawn Tan. Melbourne based artist, soap maker and teacher who’s colourful work is inspired by travel and grocery shopping among other things..

Dawn Tan_digital fabrics_custom fabric_fabric printing 5Tell us a bit about yourself and what your creative practice is, how and when you began:

Hello! My name is Dawn Tan and I’m an artist, soap maker and teacher! As a young child, I’ve always loved art and knew I wanted to pursue and art career. I guess being terrible at everything else apart from art, helped me discover that being creative was my thing. Hah! I discovered teaching many moons ago, while doing research for a children’s book I was creating and I ended up falling in love with it! To me, being able to teach and share my love for art – that’s simply the best so I just keep doing what I do! Our world needs more art so the more people share, the merrier!

Which five words best describe you? Funny, dreamy, kiddy, happy and hmmm.. CLUMSY! (The kids often have to catch my flying paintbrushes!)

Dawn Tan_digital fabrics_custom fabric_fabric printing 3If you could spend a day in another artist’s studio shoes who would that artist be?

No doubt, Quentin Blake. He’s my number one art hero and I absolutely LOVE the way he paints and creates. If I could watch him on you tube all day, I could definitely use a visit to his studio!

In another life what natural talent would you wish for?

To fly! Although I must say, I’m pretty scared of heights. Actually no. Scrap that. I’d love to be able to blink my eyes and teleport. I looooove traveling but hate the flying part. I get all anxious like a headless chook. So to be able to teleport (for free!) – that’d be super awesome. This way, I can go visit whatever place on earth I’d wish to go and I can get so much more inspiration.

Dawn Tan_digital fabrics_custom fabric_fabric printing 6Dawn Tan_digital fabrics_custom fabric_fabric printing 7Love your Locals: 

City/Town/Village where you currently reside:

Sunny Yarraville in Melbourne.

Favourite spot for a bite:

Corner store, Goje for the best, healthy yoghurts!

Secret Inspirational spot:

Pompello – My local green grocer. Haha! It’s a tiny little spot but it’s such a happy place for me. I find so much of my inspiration through grocery shopping.

Dawn Tan_digital fabrics_custom fabric_fabric printing 4You can follow what Dawn is upto: Website, Instagram, Facebook

Snippets: Chats With Creatives – Series 1, Snippet 6

Snippets’. Chats with Creatives. Here at Digital Fabrics we love everything print, pattern and colour and we love to know what makes designers tick. This series is all about asking some fun and different questions and learning about the inspirations and ideas behind the artist and their work. We hope to inspire others by sharing snippets of these creative stories. We gave the artists and designers featured a varied list of questions to choose from so we will learn something new from everyone involved, should be fun!

Today on Snippet’s we are talking to Margot Warre from Margot Design, a Sydney based Textile artist and designer with a passion for supporting Local and Ethical Production.

Margot Warre Design_digital fabrics_custom fabric_fabric printing 3Tell us a bit about yourself and what your creative practice is, how and when you began:

Creative practice for me is all about telling a story through my designs. That story will be carried all the way through the complete integrity of the design – where the designs are printed, finishing style and packaging.

I want to tell stories about the city I love. When I first started designing it was all about the trends in NY, London etc which didn’t resonate with me. I felt that my country and city is so unique that we didn’t have to look to others for inspiration it is all around us. Inspiration and stories such as uniqueness of Sydney summer, the beach on a winters day and more recently the beautiful Art Deco buildings all over Sydney.

After I have the realised the story – I start researching images, sketching, painting patterns sometimes in gauche, water colour, texta, collecting scraps of fabrics, paper – a real mixture of process, never are two collections developed the same way.

The sketches are scanned and then played with in illustrator and photoshop to create the designs digitally. I started designing my own range of textiles after years of designing for some of the industry leaders, such as Warwick Fabrics. I moved back to Sydney after living in Melbourne and began my own ranges.

Margot Warre Design_digital fabrics_custom fabric_fabric printing 4Which part of the creative process is your favourite and why?

Putting a concept / mood boards together, sourcing images that communicate your idea and colour palette. I could look for images for hours.

Which five words best describe you?

I have been told and don’t disagree: Energetic, Fun, Personable.

How would you describe your work, and what influences your style?

It has a very distinctive style, it not pretty style but handsome and I would hope reflects how we live in Australia.

Margot Warre Design_digital fabrics_custom fabric_fabric printing 5What does a typical day look like for you?

I am up early and generally do most of my work after a morning workout before heading to my “day” job.

What would your dream creative project look like?

I would love to work on a full collection of prints, weaves, knits, embroideries all made here in Australia and then work with an amazing photographer to shoot the collection.

Which other Australian designers, artists or creative people are you enjoying at the moment?

Loving what the Mirador team are doing with their textiles and knits

What has been your proudest achievement to date, creative or otherwise?

That changes, I had so many amazing moments working with Mokum and Warwick, travelling to international mills and textile trade fairs. But I do get a huge buzz when someone buys one of my designs.

Margot Warre Design_digital fabrics_custom fabric_fabric printingIf you could spend a day in another artist’s studio shoes who would that artist be?

Ahhhh that is SO hard – Sonia Dealunay

In another life what natural talent would you wish for?

I would love to be a dancer….. Another way of using my energy and being creative

If you could only use one colour in your work what would it be?

PINK! And all is shades.

Love your Locals:

City/Town/Village where you currently reside:

Sydney

Favourite spot for a bite:

Love Supreme, Oxford Street

Secret Inspirational spot:

Swims at Bronte pool on a winters day

Margot Warre Design_digital fabrics_custom fabric_fabric printing 2You can follow what Margot is upto: Website, Instagram, Facebook

Snippets: Chats With Creatives – Series 1, Snippet 5

Snippets’. Chats with Creatives. Here at Digital Fabrics we love everything print, pattern and colour and we love to know what makes designers tick. This series is all about asking some fun and different questions and learning about the inspirations and ideas behind the artist and their work. We hope to inspire others by sharing snippets of these creative stories. We gave the artists and designers featured a varied list of questions to choose from so we will learn something new from everyone involved, should be fun!

Today on Snippet’s we are talking to Lauren Bower from Lauren Skye Studio, a Textiles and homewares brand making unique cushions featuring original artwork ideal to brighten up your home and garden.

Lauren Skye Studio_digital fabrics_custom fabric_fabric printing 6The Snippety Snips:

Tell us a bit about yourself and what your creative practice is, how and when you began: 

Lauren Skye Studio is a handmade textile homewares brand creating both indoor and outdoor cushions as well as personalised name cushions.

From around the age of 7 I knew I wanted to be a fashion designer. It was all I was ever interested in and would spend hours cutting pictures from magazines (I bought my first issue of Vogue when I was 12) to make endless collages. I studied Fashion Design at TAFE and then started working as a Design Assistant and ultimately a Fashion Designer for various brands for about 10 years. After leaving fashion to start and raise a family, I desperately missed working with fabrics and colours so I started buying fabrics and making cushions (a task perfectly timed to a babies nap!). It didn’t feel authentic enough to be using a fabric that someone else had designed so drawing on my skills acquired during my years in fashion, I started creating my own fabric designs and quickly found that it is my favourite thing ever! I feel so fortunate to live in a time where digital fabric printing has made textile design so accessible for small businesses. Even during my fashion years it was outrageously expensive to have an artwork made, get a screen cut and get a strike-off printed.

Which part of the creative process is your favourite and why?

I live for design, particularly the search for inspiration. I love starting from nothing and just allowing my eye to be led and tell me where I should be. If inspiration is not coming then it is not the right time. I never force it.

Lauren Skye Studio_digital fabrics_custom fabric_fabric printing 4

Lauren Skye Studio_digital fabrics_custom fabric_fabric printing 3Which five words best describe you?

Determined, thoughtful, conscientious, friendly, chaotic.

How would you describe your work, and what influences your style?

I would describe it as unique and colourful. I think my biggest influence is my years in fashion. To counteract the things I didn’t like about fashion design, particularly the copycat aspect, I am purposefully different to other designers. I don’t follow trends and will go out of my way to ensure my work is unique. Also colour, I am always inspired by colour.

Lauren Skye Studio_digital fabrics_custom fabric_fabric printing 7What does a typical day look like for you? I have one child in school and one at pre-school three days a week, so the juggle is a little crazy right now. My three days with no kids have to be efficiently managed. From the minute I get home from drop-off to the very last minute I have to leave to pick them up I am like a woman possessed. Sometimes I’m enjoying my work so much I forget to eat! Then when the kids are home I spend time with them doing homework and just hanging out. After they are both in bed I start working again until late. Weekends are spent either selling at the local markets, or trying to juggle work and family time. It sounds terrible but I love it really!

If you could only use one colour in your work what would it be?

I’m drawn to pink always, and I have a sneaking suspicion it has something to do with having two sons!

Lauren Skye Studio_digital fabrics_custom fabric_fabric printing 5

Lauren Skye Studio_digital fabrics_custom fabric_fabric printing 2Love your Locals:                                       

City/Town/Village where you currently reside:

Roseville NSW

Favourite spot for a bite:

Salt Pepper Nutmeg or Sous le Soleil, both at Roseville

Secret Inspirational spot:

Swain Gardens, Killara. It is almost literally a secret garden.

Lauren Skye Studio_digital fabrics_custom fabric_fabric printingYou can follow what Lauren is upto here: Website, Instagram, Facebook

Snippets: Chats With Creatives – Series 1, Snippet 4

Snippets’. Chats with Creatives. Here at Digital Fabrics we love everything print, pattern and colour and we love to know what makes designers tick. This series is all about asking some fun and different questions and learning about the inspirations and ideas behind the artist and their work. We hope to inspire others by sharing snippets of these creative stories. We gave the artists and designers featured a varied list of questions to choose from so we will learn something new from everyone involved, should be fun!

Today on Snippet’s we are talking to Gabby Malpas, an artist with a flair for painting detailed still life of Australian grown flora and fauna with a hint of what Gabby calls ‘chinoiserie.’

Gabby Malpas_digital fabrics_custom fabric_fabric printingThe Snippety Snips:

Tell us a bit about yourself and what your creative practice is, how and when you began:

I’m Chinese, I was born in NZ and adopted into a white family of 9 children making me #10. I trained as a potter in Dunedin, after Art school I started using inks and watercolour on paper – as it is very much like liquid glaze. I left NZ in 1988, lived in the UK until 2003 and arrived in Sydney later that year. I’ve been a professional artist since late 2014 but exhibited and painted the whole way through since leaving art school.

I’ve been a digital project manager in agency and corporate since around 1992 – girl’s gotta eat and pay for holidays! These days I license my work, exhibit regularly, work with clients on creative stuff and get involved in a lot of adoption and community causes.

I am still learning how not to be a dick.

Which five words best describe you? 

Most can’t be repeated in public but how about: scary, mad, loyal, loud, and dependable.

Gabby Malpas_digital fabrics_custom fabric_fabric printing 3How would you describe your work, and what influences your style?

My work is figurative watercolours. It has been dismissed as purely decorative but a lot of my work actually communicates my life experiences as a trans racial, Chinese adoptee.  Some of the messages are a little hard to swallow – which is why I temper these with lavish and engaging imagery. I am influenced by a lot of artists and things: from Paul Klee, Matisse and Elizabeth Blackadder as European artists, to Japanese woodcuts and traditional SE , Central and West Asian imagery, textiles and ceramic designs.

What would your dream creative project look like?
Anything that gives me free rein to do what I like and I get paid for it… hang on – that’s a lot of what I do now.

Creative Interview with Gabby MalpasWhich other Australian designers, artists or creative people are you enjoying at the moment?

Well I discovered Cressida Campbell when I got here and she’s my idol but there are a heap of fabulous designers I follow on Instagram and Facebook  – I appreciate artists who just do their thang and are not worried about fashion or what’s hot. Oh and I’ve loved Ken Done since 1988 when I went to Brisvegas expo.

What has been your proudest achievement to date, creative or otherwise?

There have been a few: Getting some artwork into Liberty of London in the 90s, getting into the Affordable art Fair Sydney in 2009 was the first step to getting somewhere in Oz but finally calling myself a professional artist in Dec 2014 has got to be up there after nearly 30 years of slog.

Gabby Malpas_digital fabrics_custom fabric_fabric printing 2In another life what natural talent would you wish for?

It would be infinitely cool to be good at math.

If you could have your portrait painted by any artist dead or alive, who would you choose?

Not one for portraits but would love to see what Robert Crumb would do.

If you could only use one colour in your work what would it be?

PINK!

Love your Locals:

City/Town/Village where you currently reside:

Alexandria Sydney – yep, a local

Favourite spot for a bite:

Fratelli Fresh, Mitchell Road or Tuki Kanuki Erko. Fave pho place is Phd in Marrickville

Secret Inspirational spot: can I have 3?

The Asian Galleries at the AGNSW, the lotus pond in the botanic gardens and Kinokunya bookshop though I wish they’d let you sit on the step stools.

Gabby Malpas_digital fabrics_custom fabric_fabric printing 5

You can follow what Gabby is upto: Website, Instagram, Facebook

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